Archive for May, 2015

Young People and Mental Health

Lest we think mental health issues are confined to adults, the following infographic tells a different story. Thanks to a dedicated reader for bringing this information to my attention.

 

Youth Counseling
Source: TopCounselingSchools.org

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Posted by Matthew Peters - May 29, 2015 at 6:36 am

Categories: Mental Health   Tags: , , , , , , ,

An Interview with Kori Miller

Welcome, Kori!

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Tell us a bit about yourself and what you’re currently working on or promoting.

I write, and publish, sinfully scandalous mysteries for adults, and create memorable adventures for young people. Currently, I’m revising “Hush,” the first full-length novel for my private investigator, Dezeray Jackson, from the Deadly Sins series.

 

If you could have a conversation with one person living or dead who would it be?

I would love to talk with family members who’ve died. There are so many lost stories I wish I could capture.

 

Pirates or ninjas, and why?

I am a ninja. Just kidding! I’m actually a hapkidoist, so definitely going with ninja on this one. Pirates are fun and have lots of adventures, though. I don’t know. Maybe both, depending on the day.

 

Have you had to make sacrifices for your writing, and if so, what are they?

To be honest, my writing is what got sacrificed for many years. Now, I’m focused on it, and my family understands and supports me.

 

What is your number one pet peeve when it comes to writing/reading books?

I get a bit annoyed when I realize that the author isn’t interested in their story anymore. I’m talking specifically about series writing. To me, if the writer doesn’t enjoy what they’re writing, then it’s time for them to write something new. If they’re bored with their main character, and the supporting cast, then as I read their book, I’m bored, too.

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book, and what was it?

The creation of each book teaches me something. Being an indie author means handling every aspect of your writing career. That’s one reason I love doing it. When I wrote and published my first book, I had no clue how to self-publish or format a book. I’ve come a long way since 2011. There are an amazing amount of resources (free and paid) for indie authors. If your audience, for example, hops over to www.koridmiller.com, they can get a free copy of my favorite WordPress plugins.

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ve always been a writer, but I never considered myself an author until three things happened: 1) My work began being published in Fine Lines Literary Journal (and I received fan mail), 2) I won first place in a flash fiction writing contest (that I didn’t realize I’d entered), and 3) two women tracked me down in a parking lot to ask me about my first book (My Life in Black and White: A Book of Experiences). More recently, I was speaking with a person via the phone about something unrelated to my writing, and she asked, “Are you Kori Miller, the author?” That felt pretty good.

 

Do you have anything specific you want to say to your readers?

I write genre fiction, not literary fiction, so for me, it’s all about crafting a story that’s a fun, not too serious, read. I might include serious themes, but my approach via my characters, makes the material less threatening.

 

Would you rather have one giant bestseller or a long string of moderate sellers?

I’m not really an either/or kind of person. It’s possible to experience both. A best seller is awesome, but then what? And, moderate sellers are cool, and might pay the bills, but there’s no movie deal, right? I’d love to see Dezeray Jackson on the big screen, and I’d get a kick out of my two MGs going that direction, too. It’s all good. Why not embrace every possibility?

 

Would you rather read a book that is poorly written but has an excellent story, or read one with weak content, but is well written?

If poorly written translates as, “several mistakes on every other page,” then I won’t read the book, but I also won’t read something that either bores me, or doesn’t give me what I want.

 

Do you think a writer should write every day?

I think a writer needs to figure out what works best for their style and goals. I write, at least, five days/week, but I’m not always working on a manuscript. I learned that writing in the morning works best for me, regardless of the project, so I tend to complete non-writing tasks during afternoon hours (marketing, PR, sock puppet-making, presentations, etc.)

 

What five words would you use to describe yourself?

Tenacious, Honest, Enthusiastic, Empathetic, Focused

 

Tell us something about yourself that few people know.

I can learn just about anything, and then teach it to other people within the same day. Mathematics excluded. I spent ten years in training & development. Part of my job was to learn other people’s jobs well enough to take over, and then to train the staff, including whoever would eventually replace me. I’m geeky about learning new things and being an entrepreneur fits my personality well.

 

Give us one piece of sage advice on writing, relationships, or life in general.

I’m not the first to write this, and I’m sure I won’t be the last: Do what you love and the rest will follow.

 

Please tell us about your show Back Porch Writer.

The show, now with two years of live programming behind it, is for writers, about writers, and writing. The goal of the program is to bring the writing conference to you, via author interviews and subject matter experts, in a variety of areas. BPW airs every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. CDT, and Scribe Talk airs three Sundays, each month, at 5:30 p.m. CDT. Follow the show, become a fan, and support it.  Back Porch Writer also offers affordable advertising opportunities for authors.  If you want more information about that, visit www.backporchwriter.com.

 

Please share your social media links with us, including where the book(s) may be purchased:

Tweet with me @KMillerWrites and @backporchwriter

Facebook: Kori Miller Writes, Back Porch Writer, Author Kori D Miller

Google+: Kori Miller and Back Porch Writer

LinkedIn: Kori Miller

Websites: Kori D. Miller, Kori Miller Kid Lit, Kori Miller Writes, Back Porch Writer

Amazon

Smashwords (Distributes my books to all major online retailers, including KOBO and Barnes & Noble)

 

Thanks so much for joining us today, Kori! Please keep us posted on your latest developments.

 

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Deadly Sins I: A Dezeray Jackson Mini-Series ** Excerpt **

I opted to walk the four blocks from my apartment to the New York City office of Tracer International. It was my last day. By this time tomorrow, I’d be heading to Omaha, NE. A free house was an offer I couldn’t refuse. And, Omaha would be a welcome change of pace.

“Dez.” Sam Walters greeted me as I stepped out of the elevator on the 20th floor.

“Sam.” I kept walking. He tagged along. The office was like every other place I’d worked. The elevator door opened and the reception desk was all you saw. To the right, a door led to the back offices and cubicles for entry-and mid-level investigators. That was me. I waved my ID in front of the sensor. There was a click, and the lock released.

“You’ve got one more assignment. Becker dropped it on your desk an hour ago.”

I checked my watch. It was 7:30 a.m.

“He said I should go along with you.”

I stopped at my desk. A file rested in the center. I’d cleaned everything else out last night, not that it amounted to much after two years. It all fit in a shoebox. I opened the file.

“It’s a stolen-property case. The client doesn’t want the police involved. I’m not sure why.” Sam plopped down in a chair next to my desk. He was an entry-level investigator.

“Sasha Alexander? Why do I know that name?” I asked more to myself than to Sam, but he spoke up anyway.

“Socialite. She owns a gallery in SOHO.” He twirled a pencil between his fingers.

“Wait a minute! Not that gallery?”

“One and the same.” He grinned.

“Christ.” I dropped the file. “Let’s go.”

We grabbed a taxi. Screw the trains. It was my last day. Company-paid expenses are a privilege I’d be without in about 24 hours.

Alexander’s gallery fit in perfectly with all the others in SOHO until you walked through the doors. I paused on the street in front and took a deep breath.

“Let’s go!” Sam, always the eager one, reached for the handle. People pushed past me on the sidewalk. I followed Sam through large, ornately-carved wood doors into a small alcove. Heavy, plush, red drapes hung from the ceiling, blocking our view.

Sam pulled one of the drapes aside, allowing me to enter the gallery.

“Oy,” I mumbled, and took it all in at once. Some things can’t be unseen.

“Wow” was all Sam could manage to say.

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Posted by Matthew Peters - May 26, 2015 at 4:41 am

Categories: Author Interviews   Tags: , , , , , , ,

An Interview with Alianne Donnelly

Welcome, Alianne!

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Tell us a bit about yourself and what you are currently working on or promoting.

Hello! Thank you for having me! My name is Alianne and I am a writer of fiction, predominantly romance in several subgenres, including paranormal, fantasy and science fiction. I have also recently released a post-apocalypse dystopian which is a new thing for me, but the responses have been so wonderful I can’t help but be glad I did it. For anyone interested, the book is called WOLFEN and is available at all major online retailers in eBook and print format.

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I am also currently finishing up the last in a series of paranormal romance, titled BLOOD HUNT. It’s set in a dystopian future where trouble is brewing. In this installment, the people have finally had enough and risen up in war against a manipulative government. Since my heroine is a mind reader, the story centers around the mind, and how it can be manipulated, bent, and even broken to further a specific agenda. It’s a bit on the dark side, and doesn’t shy away from the horrors the heroine goes through as she struggles to stay sane. I am aiming for a late 2015 release with this one. Fingers crossed! =)

You can read all about these two titles, as well as my back list and upcoming projects on my website: http://aliannedonnelly.com

 

If you could have a conversation with one person living or dead who would it be?

Without a doubt, I’d want to chat with Leonardo da Vinci. To me, he is the epitome of what a mind can achieve. The sheer breadth and scope of what he’s accomplished in his lifetime is astonishing. I’d just sit there and let him talk. Imagine the things he might say!

 

Is there a theme/message underlying your book(s) that you hope comes across?

You know, it’s odd. I didn’t think there would be, but now that you mention it, many of my books seem to have a theme of characters taking on the mantle of great responsibility, and coming to terms with it, and eventually accepting that there is no one else to do a job that must be done for the greater good. Some handle this with more grace than others. LOL

 

If you could be any character in literature, who would you choose to be?

Hmm, that’s a tough one. I think I’d want to be The Beast from G.A. Aiken’s WHAT A DRAGON SHOULD KNOW. She’s far from perfect, but she is clever, cunning, something of a spy and diplomat at the same time, and she lives in a time and place of dragons. Who wouldn’t want a lifetime filled with dragons? Incidentally, I also happen to be a great fan of the series, and highly recommend it to everyone. =)

 

Pirates or ninjas, and why?

Ack! Can I choose pirate ninjas? Why not! *stomps foot* All right, fine. I guess if I had to choose, I’d say ninjas. I get sea sick on long boat rides. LOL

 

Has reading a book ever changed your life? If yes, which one and how?

Absolutely! Many books, at many times, in different ways. Joseph Conrad’s HEART OF DARKNESS was a huge eye opener for me in the way it was written. You get the sense of being part of the scene, never separate, and that is an amazing feat. The story comes alive in your mind, which is what every book should do for a reader. The second one was THE RULE OF FOUR by Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason. It’s a deceptive read in many ways, the very definition of subtle. A lot of readers find it boring, but if you pay attention and stick it out to the end, it surprises you. The characters surprise you in the way they sneakily burrow under your skin without you noticing. The emotional impact of that one came out of nowhere for me, and it’s something I’ll never forget.

These are just two of the many books that have made me want to be a writer myself, to be able to tell a story that well, and have that deep an impact on readers. It’s like learning to do magic from the masters, in a way.

 

Have you had to make sacrifices for your writing, and if so, what are they?

I have given up certain things and opportunities in order to keep writing the way I do, but I do not consider them sacrifices. To me, writing is essential, much like food and sleep. It’s one of the basics I require in order to live a fulfilling life. Giving it up—THAT would be a sacrifice, and my life would have to depend on it for me to even consider.

 

What is your number one pet peeve when it comes to writing/books?

Interruptions. Writing takes time to get into, and once you’re there, any break in concentration yanks you out of the flow and you have to fight to get back in. It’s the same with reading for me. I enter a different world, and getting pulled back is in many ways a rude awakening. I tend to not react well when that happens. LOL

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book, and what was it?

I learned about myself, mostly. About the way I view the world, and the way I want to express myself in it. My own voice becomes stronger with each new story, because I know the rhythm now of how the words should flow. I’ve learned I’m something of a perfectionist, and many times I will dwell on a single word out of a hundred thousand, because to me it makes a huge difference. The frustrating part is that I have come to expect that same level of attention to detail from others, both in work-related issues and personal ones, and even I realize it’s not fair to others. In that sense, it’s taught me to be more patient, too. =)

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I know the exact moment. Last semester of high school. My AP English teacher brought a box of poetry books to class as gifts to the students for a great year. We didn’t know it then, but it was her final year—she retired after we graduated—so the books were a fond farewell. She wrote a message into each of them, and mine read that she expected to see my name on the New York Times Bestseller List sometime soon. Now, I’d been writing little things here and there all my life, since I could spell words on a page, but reading that note was the first time I thought, “I will do it. Why not?” I wrote my first full novel that summer, rapidly followed by several others, none of which will ever see the light of day. I knew I wouldn’t be able to write full time for quite a while, but that wasn’t about to stop me. I just kept at it. I probably would have written a book eventually, whether I’d seen that beautiful note or not, but only as a hobby. It would have taken me years, and I never would have even thought about trying to get it published.

 

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

All of them! Without exception, every single book I’ve ever read has taught me something. Style, genre, diction, point of view, format, even the mistakes, or stories I thought could have been better, or the ones that just plain didn’t appeal to me taught me either what I wanted to do, or what I wanted to avoid doing.

 

Would you rather have one giant bestseller or a long string of moderate sellers?

Every writer, I think, dreams of one day hitting it out of the park with a masterpiece for the ages. I wouldn’t say no to one of those, either. But if it meant that one title would be the last (or only) thing readers ever thought worthwhile, I’d rather keep writing in obscurity for the few who continue to enjoy my books.

 

Do you have anything specific you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. With all my heart, thank you for taking a chance on a writer you didn’t know. For every enthusiastic email I have received, telling me how much you loved my books, for every review you’ve left online, I am truly grateful. Writing is such a solitary undertaking, it warms my heart to know that somewhere across the invisible veil, there is someone listening to the words I speak. You make what I do a beautifully wonderful undertaking. =)

 

Would you rather read a book that is poorly written but has an excellent story, or read one with weak content, but is well written?

I read to immerse myself in a good story, so I am willing to overlook a lot of mistakes if the story is worthy. I can count on one hand the number of books I hadn’t finished once I started, but they were abandoned because the story wasn’t good.

 

What is the hardest thing about writing a series?

The genre tends to change over the arc of the story. Writing romance, it always happens that the “heat level” peters out toward the end because the greater story of the series takes precedence, needing a satisfying resolution.  BLOOD HUNT will be the last book in a series that borders on erotic romance, and it’s stretching in length beyond any of the others because I don’t want to sacrifice the relationship for the greater good, but it is quite a struggle to balance the two.

 

Do you think a writer should write every day?

I’d be a hypocrite if I said yes. It’s not always easy to write on a set schedule. Creativity, by definition, is a chaotic force and doesn’t tend to do well within the restrictions of a regimented schedule. I have great respect for writers who do manage it. I simply can’t.

 

Tell us something about yourself that few people know.

I have been told more than once that I can be intimidating, even to people who’ve known me for a long time. The truth is I’m more shy of others than they are of me.

Thank you again for having me! I had a great time and hope to see you all around the social media circles. =)

 

Please share your social media links with us, including where the book(s) may be purchased:

My books can be purchased at these links:
Kobo (this one doesn’t have a convenient link for the author pages): https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/search?query=Alianne%20Donnelly&fcsearchfield=Author&fclanguages=all

Thank you, Alianne! Please keep us posted on your latest developments.

Wolfen

WOLFEN

 

Blurb:

Man’s quest for genetic perfection has led to the creation of new subspecies. Wolfen were the pinnacle of scientific achievement, redefining the limits of what it means to be human. Their counterparts, in turn, grew into the ultimate predators. Incapable of higher thought, converts were unstoppable in their need to breed and devour, and when they escaped, they brought the world to its knees.

Almost two decades later, humanity is on the brink of extinction and only the heartless survive. Rescued by two Wolfen brothers, Sinna must now brave the treacherous wastelands of North America in order to reach safety and the promise of a better life. But when an unexpected gambit forces them to separate, a genetic advantage becomes a liability, and the worst monsters turn out to be the ones who don’t have claws.

In the game of survival, Wolfen were created to be champions. No longer. The enemy keeps evolving, rendering old tactics ineffective, and the only rule left is to endure at any cost.

 

Excerpt:

Gasping for air, Sallinger slammed the door shut and locked it. “They breeched the holding pens,” he said, heading for the security console.

“What?”

It took him three tries to enter his code and then the screen split in nine, showing security feeds from this wing of the facility. “I knew I never should have signed off on the transfer,” Sallinger rambled. “My God, they’ll kill us all.”

The break in his voice sent a chill down Leslie’s spine. “W-what are you talking about?”

He rubbed his sweaty face, shaking from head to toe as he watched the screen. Two of the nine feeds showed a lot of scientists heading in one direction with several children. Two more showed the convert holding pens. They were empty. “The crazy Japs! Michito didn’t come alone. Fukushima den was compromised. They were storing too many fully grown converts and they broke free. Michito didn’t want to lose twenty years of research so he captured several of them and brought them here.”

She gaped. “Is he insane?”

Sallinger was shaking so hard he knocked his glasses off his nose trying to adjust them. He was wheezing, on the verge of tears and his obvious distress was sending Sigma Nine into wailing fits. “She knows,” Sallinger said, staring at the child. “She can probably sense them. We can use her to get out.”

Leslie twisted to keep the little girl away from him. “Don’t you dare!” But her gaze was stuck on the screen, all those people looking over their shoulders nervously.

“Have you heard nothing? We’re going to die if we don’t get out.”

She circled around Sallinger to get to the screen. Her thumb print would be enough to signal distress in this lab. “The guards will take care of it.” She was certain of it. They were highly trained mercenaries, paid well for their service and their response time was usually less than seventy seconds. Of course they could handle this. They would come escort the three of them to safety.

But Sallinger was shaking his head. “They’re all dead! Fully grown converts are not like the children, Dr. Gerome. They feed and they breed, and they are unstoppable when the urge hits them. It’s like a hive mind effect. The Fukushima ones were starved, and their frenzy riled up the converts here. The den is overrun!”

No, that couldn’t be. He was just in hysterics. When he calmed down, he would realize how crazy that sounded. A small army of guards dead? No way. She would show him. Adjusting Sigma Nine in her hold, she typed one handed, looking for a duty roster. Everyone on active shift had a tracker in their radio unit and could be reached directly in an emergency. But she called one after the other with her digital page and no one answered. Her throat suddenly dry, Leslie shook her head and tried again, one after the other.

One by one, the signals disappeared as if they’d become deactivated. Either every one of those radios got smashed, or someone—or something—had damaged the main controls in the lower level server hive. She couldn’t call out. Which meant no one was coming. They were on their own.

Apprehensive, starting to feel herself give in to Sallinger’s paranoia, and irritated by the red emergency lighting, Leslie backed away from the screen. “What about the others?”

Sallinger hesitated.

What!

He jerked his chin toward the screen just as the last of the groups disappeared from the shots. “They’re already evacuating. The researchers and orderlies are gone, along with whatever children they had with them at the time. The rest they left for dead.”

 

Read more at http://aliannedonnelly.com/wolfen

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Posted by Matthew Peters - May 19, 2015 at 4:23 am

Categories: Author Interviews   Tags: , ,

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

May-Mental-HealthSince 1949 in this country Mental Health Awareness Month has been observed in May. It is an attempt to reach people through the media, local events, and screenings, in an effort to end the stigma that is associated with mental illness.

What can we do to take part?

One thing we can all do is educate ourselves and others on the extent of mental illness in the United States:

It is estimated that 1 in 5 adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in any given year.

This sobering statistic is equal to the number of people who suffer from some form of heart disease. Yet, there is little stigma against heart disease. Most people aren’t embarrassed if they have a heart attack. But the shame that accompanies a bout with mental illness can be debilitating.

Perhaps even more telling, 1 in 2 Americans will meet the criteria for having a mental health condition at some point in their lives.

So if we remain prejudiced against those who suffer from mental illness, we might as well remain prejudiced against women, as a group, or men.

This year’s theme is “Get Connected,” which emphasizes the important role of social relationships in protecting and improving mental health and building resiliency. Part of getting connected involves creating environments safe enough for people to share their struggles with mental illness.

If you know someone who has mental illness, and chances are good you do, please consider listening to them when they talk about what they are going through.

If you desire more information on mental health see the website of the American Mental Health Association: www.mentalhealthamerica.net. You can download an informational toolkit at: http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/may.

Let’s make every month mental health month. And let’s join together to end the stigma of mental illness once and for all.

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Posted by Matthew Peters - May 3, 2015 at 11:07 am

Categories: Mental Health   Tags: , ,

An Interview with Jennifer Moorman

Welcome back, Jennifer!

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I’m so excited to have you on my blog today. I want to start off by saying that Jennifer is giving away a copy (either paperback or e-book) of her latest book, Honeysuckle Hollow. To be entered in the giveaway, all you have to do is leave a comment below. The contest ends at 11:59:59 this evening, May 1. Good luck to all of you!

 

Tell us a bit about yourself and what you are currently working on or promoting.

I’m a southern girl who loves to read, cook, and take adventures. I also love to write, and my newest novel, Honeysuckle Hollow, releases today (May 1), making it my third published novel.

 

If you could have a conversation with one person living or dead who would it be?

My mama. She passed away when I was a little girl, and I think it would be interesting to talk to her now that I’m older.

 

Is there a theme/message underlying your book(s) that you hope comes across?

What I hope readers take away from my books is the feeling that everything works out for a reason (most likely a positive reason), even when we don’t understand anything in the middle of our storms. I hope readers are entertained and uplifted, and I hope when they finish reading one of my books, they feel a little lighter than when they started reading it.

 

If you could be any character in literature, who would you choose to be?

Hermione Granger 100%. And I’d likely fight Ginny for Harry.

 

Pirates or ninjas, and why?

Oooh, ninjas. They’re refined and clever, and they use their brains rather than rushing into every situation with swords swinging and voices yelling. I like the quiet approach.

 

Have you had to make sacrifices for your writing, and if so, what are they?

Sleep mostly. Free weekends on occasion. But I love writing, and often it doesn’t feel like work, so a few lost hours of sleep are acceptable.

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book, and what was it?

From writing Honeysuckle Hollow I learned to stop doubting myself so often/so much. I learned to just keep writing, and when I’m finished, there is still time to go back and polish my work. Oftentimes what I think is dumb or lame isn’t actually that bad after I’ve had a few days to rest from it.

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

2012. I’ve always been a writer, but I never called myself a writer until the year I told myself, “If you’re going to say you’re a writer, then you need to write that book you’ve been itching to write.” I set goals, I worked hard, I achieved my goals, and The Baker’s Man was published.

 

Do you have anything specific you want to say to your readers?

Thank you!

 

Would you rather have one giant bestseller or a long string of moderate sellers?

Seeing as how I have a string of moderate sellers, I’ll take that. Just having my books out in the world is a beautiful accomplishment for me.

 

Would you rather read a book that is poorly written but has an excellent story, or read one with weak content, but is well written?

Neither. I’d rather read a children’s board book than read a poorly written novel or one with weak content.

 

Do you think a writer should write every day?

Yes. At least five days a week. I’ll give you two days off because I’m considerate. J

 

What five words would you use to describe yourself?

Creative, kind, imaginative, hardworking, dedicated.

 

Tell us something about yourself that few people know.

I could eat an egg burrito every day. Every. Day. But I don’t!

 

If you could marry a fictional character whom would it be?

Captain America

 

Give us one piece of sage advice on writing, relationships, or life in general.

Work hard. Dream big. Dreams don’t work hard unless you do. Be kind to people and be kind to yoursel

 

Please share your social media links with us, including where the book(s) may be purchased:

Website: http://www.jennifermoorman.com/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/jennifermoormanbooks

Twitter: www.twitter.com/JenniferReneeM

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/jenniferreneem/

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/6644110.Jennifer_Moorman

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jennifer+moorman

Purchase Honeysuckle Hollow here: http://www.amazon.com/Honeysuckle-Hollow-Jennifer-Moorman/dp/151164950X/ref=sr_1_1_twi_2_pap?ie=UTF8&qid=1430419592&sr=8-1&keywords=honeysuckle+hollow

 

Thank you so much, Jennifer! Please keep us posted on your latest developments.

HoneysuckleHollowCover

Back Cover

Tessa Andrews believes she has her life all figured out, organized in carefully numbered lists to ensure she doesn’t make bad decisions. But her meticulous process is shaken when torrential rain hits Mystic Water for twenty-six hours, forty-four minutes, and two seconds, leaving parts ofthe town, and her condo, drowning in floodwater.

While seeking a more permanent residence, Tessa temporarily moves into an empty apartment above the Borellis’ diner. Then she receives a package containing a set of tarnished keys belonging to the neglected historic mansion Honeysuckle Hollow, and a whole new set of troubles arise. When the Borellis’ prodigal son visits Mystic Water and wants to stay in the apartment, Tessa tosses her numbered lists aside and makes a surprisingly reckless decision: she uses her entire life savings to buy Honeysuckle Hollow. But this historic home has a few surprises of its own.

Nearly everyone doubts Tessa’s sanity, but she finds unlikely support in an ancient Cherokee spear, a traveling mint plant, and a handsome architect on the run from his past. Will Honeysuckle Hollow outlast its naysayers and survive the town’s capricious weather? Will Tessa be able to save the house and finally learn to follow her heart? Filled with charm, unexpected twists, and just a touch of magic, Honeysuckle Hollow is an enchanting tale of listening to one’s heart, camping out indoors, and the difference acts of kindness can make.

 

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Posted by Matthew Peters - May 1, 2015 at 4:26 am

Categories: Author Interviews   Tags: ,

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